iii. Booking – standard procedure:

     This page is continued from Criminal Proceedings >>>> 1. The Arrest, Search and Seizure, and Booking:

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book:
vb. (13c)

1. To record the name of (a person arrested) in a sequential list of police arrests, with details of the person’s identity (usually including a photograph and a fingerprint), particulars about the alleged offense, and the name of the arresting officer <the defendant was booked immediately after arrest>. [1]

booking – A police-station term for the entry of an arrest and the charge for which the arrest was made. [2]

1. A police station term for the entry of an arrest and the charge for which the arrest was made.
See blotter.

blotter

1. See ARREST RECORD.  2. See WASTE BOOK.

1. A police record, kept at the station, of arrests.
     See rough minutes. [2]

1. A record of arrests made by the police and kept at the police station. [3]

rough minutes – 1. Unofficial memoranda, made by the clerk of the court for his own convenience, of orders as they are announced by the court.

Such memoranda are made by the clerk for his own guidance in entering the orders of the court on the register and in the minutes of the court, and do not constitute an official record of the court, although they are sometimes useful as evidence.  The book in which such memoranda are made by the clerk is often referred to as a “blotter.” Brownell v Superior Court of Yolo County, 157 Cal 703, 109 P 91. [2]

arrest record – A summary of the dates on which a person has previously been arrested, the law enforcement agencies that made the arrests, and the offenses charges.
     See rap sheet. [1]

1. A summary of the dates on which a person has previously been arrested, the law enforcement agencies that made the arrests, and the offenses charged. [3]

rap sheet (1960) Slang. A person’s criminal record. — aka criminal-history record. [1]

1. A list containing a person’s arrest and conviction record, including dates, jurisdictions, and offenses.  It is available to all law enforcement agencies.
     See NCIC. [3]

NCIC – The customary way of referring to the National Crime Information Center, a computerized network used by police departments across the country to determine if there are outstanding warrants on a suspect or an arrestee, to locate missing persons, and to trace stolen vehicles, guns, and the like. [3]

waste-book (17c) 1. A merchant’s book for making rough entries or transactions before posting them into a journal. — aka blotter. [1]

1. A book of original entry of accounts in which all transactions are entered; a blotter. [2]

References:

Disclaimer: All material throughout this website is pertinent to people everywhere, and is being utilized in accordance with Fair Use.

[1]: Black’s Law Dictionary Deluxe Tenth Edition by Henry Campbell Black & Editor in Chief Bryan A. Garner. ISBN: 978-0-314-62130-6

[2]: Ballantine’s Law Dictionary with Pronunciations
Third Edition by James A. Ballantine (James Arthur 1871-1949).  Edited by William S. Anderson.  © 1969 by THE LAWYER’S CO-OPERATIVE PUBLISHING COMPANY.  Library of Congress Catalog Card No. 68-30931

[3]:  Ballantine’s Law Dictionary Legal Assistant Edition
by Jack Ballantine 
(James Arthur 1871-1949).  Doctored by Jack G. Handler, J.D. © 1994 Delmar by Thomson Learning.  ISBN 0-8273-4874-6.

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