Tort-of-Another Doctrine – in some states, a statutory rule authorizing courts to award litigation related expenses (i.e. attorney’s fees) to a prevailing party forced to bring or defend a lawsuit against a third party for a tort committed by someone else who refused, after notice, to bring or defend the lawsuit

tort-of-another doctrine:
(1986)

1. Torts. In some states, a statutory rule that authorizes a court to award litigation related expenses, including attorney’s fees, to a prevailing party forced to bring or defend a lawsuit against a third party for a tort committed by someone else who refused, after notice, to bring or defend the lawsuit.  *  The tort-of-another doctrine is an exception to the general American rule about attorney’s fees.  See AMERICAN RULE (I).

American Rule:
(1868)

1. The general policy that all litigants, even the prevailing one, must bear their own attorney’s fees.  The Rule is subject to bad-faith and other statutory and contractual exceptions. [1]

References:

Disclaimer: All material throughout this website is pertinent to people everywhere, and is being utilized in accordance with Fair Use.

[1]: Black’s Law Dictionary Deluxe Tenth Edition by Henry Campbell Black, Editor in Chief Bryan A. Garner. ISBN: 978-0-314-61300-4

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