Irreparable (Nonpecuniary) Damages – in the law of injunctions, an injury that cannot be satisfactorily or completely compensated with money, so that to refuse the injunction would be a denial of justice

irreparable damages:
(1874)

1. Damages that cannot be easily ascertained because there is no fixed pecuniary standard of measurement, e.g., damages for a repeated public nuisance. — aka nonpecuniary damages. [1]

1. In the law of injunctions, an injury of such a nature that there is no adequate remedy in a court of law and for which, therefore, recourse must be sought in a court of equity; an injury that cannot be satisfactorily or completely compensated with money.  Th term does not refer to the amount of damage caused, or the amount of the damages, but to the difficult of measuring the amount of the damages.
    Compare reparable injury. [2]

1. See irreparable injury. [3]

 

nonpecuniary damages:
(1900)

1. Damages that cannot be measured in money. — aka noneconomic damages. [1]

1. Damages for injury of such nature that there is no money standard applicable in measurement of the amount of damages.  Broughel v Southern New England Tel. Co. 73 Conn 614, 621

Damages the amount of which depends upon the enlightened judgment of an impartial court or jury, since it is not a matter of mathematical calculation, as illustrated in damages for pain, suffering, and defamation.  L.W. Pomereae v White, 70 Neb 171, 97 NW 232. [3]

References:

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[1]: Black’s Law Dictionary Deluxe Tenth Edition by Henry Campbell Black, Editor in Chief Bryan A. Garner. ISBN: 978-0-314-61300-4

[2]: Ballantine’s Law Dictionary Legal Assistant Edition by Jack Ballantine (James Arthur 1871-1949).  Doctored by Jack G. Handler, J.D. © 1994 Delmar by Thomson Learning.  ISBN 0-8273-4874-6.

[3]: Ballantine’s Law Dictionary with Pronunciations
Third Edition by James A. Ballantine (James Arthur 1871-1949).  Edited by William S. Anderson.  © 1969 by THE LAWYER’S CO-OPERATIVE PUBLISHING COMPANY.  Library of Congress Catalog Card No. 68-30931

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