Rule 47 – Selecting Jurors

Federal Rules of Civil Procedure Simplified:
Title VI – Trials
Rule 47 – Selecting Jurors

Continued from Rule 46 – Objecting to a Ruling or Order.

****************************************

Rule 47 Transcript:

(a) Examining Jurors. The court may permit the parties or their attorneys to examine prospective jurors or may itself do so.  If the court examines the jurors, it must permit the parties or their attorneys to make any further inquiry it considers proper, or must itself ask any of their additional questions it considers proper.

(b) Peremptory Challenges. The court must allow the number of peremptory challenges provided by 28 U.S.C. §1870.

(c) Excusing a Juror. During trial or deliberation, the court may excuse a juror for good cause.

Transcript of 28 U.S.C. §1870:

United States Code
Title 28 – JUDICIARY AND JUDICIAL PROCEDURE
PART V – PROCEDURE
CHAPTER 121 – JURIES; TRIAL BY JURY

§1870. Challenges

     In civil cases, each party shall be entitled to three peremptory challenges. Several defendants or several plaintiffs may be considered as a single party for the purposes of making challenges, or the court may allow additional peremptory challenges and permit them to be exercised separately or jointly.

     All challenges for cause or favor, whether to the array or panel or to individual jurors, shall be determined by the court. [2]

Next Rule:

Rule 48 – Number of Jurors; Verdict; Polling

******************************************

References:

Disclaimer: All material throughout this website is pertinent to people everywhere, and is being utilized in accordance with Fair Use.

[1]: United States Courts, Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (2017):  www.uscourts.gov/rules-policies/current-rules-practice-procedure/federal-rules-civil-procedure

[2]: U.S. House of Representatives’ Office of Law Revision Counsel, “28 U.S.C. §1870”: http://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?req=granuleid:USC-prelim-title28-section1870&num=0&edition=prelim

******************************************

Federal Rules of Civil Procedure Simplified

All Federal Rules of Procedure Simplified

Intro to Law

Like this website?

Please Support Our Fundraiser

or donate via PayPal:

 

Disclaimer: Wild Willpower does not condone the actions of Maximilian Robespierre, however the above quote is excellent!

This website is being broadcast for First Amendment purposes courtesy of

Question(s)?  Suggestion(s)?
Distance@WildWillpower.org.
We look forward to hearing from you!

Learn the System