Political-Action Committee – An organization formed by a special-interest group to raise and contribute money to the campaigns of political candidates who seem likely to promote its interests; a group formed by a business, union, or interest group to help raise money for politicians who support the group’s public-policy interests

political-action committee:
(1839)

1. An organization formed by a special-interest group to raise and contribute money to the campaigns of political candidates who seem likely to promote its interests; a group formed by a business, union, or interest group to help raise money for politicians who support the group’s public-policy interests. — Abbr. PAC.  See INTEREST GROUP. [1]

1. A PAC is a committee or other body organized to receive funds in support of candidates for elective office.  The activities of PACs are regulated by federal statute. [2]

     Excerpt from Daniel S. Ward’s “PACs and Congressional Decisions,” in Encyclopedia of the American Legislative System (Joel H. Silbey ed., 1994):

     “To the degree that PACs resemble other organized interest groups, their emergence should not be cause for alarm.  Like the AFL-CIO, the Business Roundtable, the NAACP, the AARP, or Greenpeace, any single political action committee is a collection of individuals (in most cases) with shared interests who have decided to unite in an effort to effect desirable political outcomes.  But what is particularly interesting about PACs-and troubling to some-is the precise nature of their efforts to achieve their goals.  Whereas lobbyists are increasingly limited in what they can provide for legislators in an attempt to influence the policy-making process, the essence of PACs is to provide financial resources to aid election campaigns.  The direct provision of money to lawmakers conjures up images of influence peddling, vote buying, and power brokering, all of which are anathema to representative government.  Thus, although PACs fall under the general rubric of ‘interest groups,’ it is the financial nature of their relationship to members of Congress that makes them subject to close scrutiny. [3]

political body. A body of government, such as a “8 legislature or municipal commission. A body estable. lished as a source or administrator of governmental ’3’ power, such as a state, a county, a municipality.

Not the same as a political party. Brown v Finnegan, 369 Pa 609, 133 AZd 809.

 

political committee:

1. Any committee or combination of three or more persons co-operating to aid or promote the success or defeat of a political party. Anno: 125 ALR 1031.

The organized force of a political party in the nation as the national committee, in the state as the state committee, and locally as a county or town committee, consisting of committeemen, elected in a primary election and leaders known as chairmen or executive committeemen, maintaining an office and staff of workers, particularly in the six months preceding an election. [3]

References:

Disclaimer: All material throughout this website is pertinent to people everywhere, and is being utilized in accordance with Fair Use.

[1]: Black’s Law Dictionary Deluxe Tenth Edition by Henry Campbell Black, Editor in Chief Bryan A. Garner. ISBN: 978-0-314-61300-4

[2]: Ballantine’s Law Dictionary Legal Assistant Edition by Jack Ballantine (James Arthur 1871-1949).  Doctored by Jack G. Handler, J.D. © 1994 Delmar by Thomson Learning.  ISBN 0-8273-4874-6.

[3]: Daniel S. Ward, “PACs and Congressional Decisions,” in 2 Encyclopedia of the American Legislative System 1092 (Joel H. Silbey ed., 1994).

[4]: Ballantine’s Law Dictionary with Pronunciations
Third Edition by James A. Ballantine (James Arthur 1871-1949).  Edited by William S. Anderson.  © 1969 by THE LAWYER’S CO-OPERATIVE PUBLISHING COMPANY.  Library of Congress Catalog Card No. 68-30931

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