Exhibit – a document, record, or other tangible object formally introduced as evidence in court

 

exhibit:
n. (17c)

1. A document, record, or other tangible object formally introduced as evidence in court.

2. A document attached to and made part of a pleading, motion, contract, or other instrument. [1]

1. A copy of a written intrument on which a pleading is founded, annexed to the pleading and by reference made a part of it. 41 Am J1st Pl § 55.

Any paper or thing offered in evidence and marked for identification.  Item of real or demonstrative evidence offered in evidence for observation by court or jury. 29 Am J2d Ev § 771. [2]

1. Any paper or thing offered in evidence and marked for identification.

2. A document attached to and made part of a pleading, transcript, contract, or other legal paper. [3]

exhibit list (1929) 1. A pretrial filing that identifies by number and description the exhibits a party intends to offer into evidence at trial.  *  Courts often require the exchange of exhibit lists before trial so that evidentiary disputes can be resolved with minimal disruption in the course of a jury trial.  2. A document prepared during a trial by the clerk or a courtroom deputy to identify by number and description the exhibits that the parties have entered into evidence. [1]

Historical Terms:

exhibit vb. (16c) Archaic. To bring a lawsuit by filing (a bill).

exhibitio billae [Latin] Hist. The commencement of a suit by presenting or exhibiting a bill to the court.

exhibition (1861) Scots law. An action to compel the production or delivery of documents.

exhibitory interdict – See INTERDICT (1). [1]

exhibere – vb. [Latin] 1. To present (a tangible thing) so that it may be handled. 2. To appear personally to defend against an action at law. [1]

To be sorted:

exhaustion-of-rights doctrine. (1977) Intellectual property. The principle that once the owner of an intellectual-pr0p~ erty right has placed a product covered by that right into the marketplace, the right to control how the product is resold within that internal market is lost. 0 Within a common market, such as the European Union, the doctrine also applies to the import and export of the goods between member countries. Cf. PATENT-EXHAUS~ TION DOCTRINE. -Often shortened to exhaustion doctrine. ‘

exhaustion of state remedies. (1944) The doctrine that an available state remedy must be exhausted in certain types of cases before a party can gain access to a federal court. 0 For example, a state prisoner must exhaust all state remedies before a federal court will hear a petition for habeas corpus.

References:

Disclaimer: All material throughout this website is compiled in accordance with Fair Use.

[1]: Black’s Law Dictionary Deluxe Tenth Edition by Henry Campbell Black & Editor in Chief Bryan A. Garner. ISBN: 978-0-314-62130-6

[2]: Ballantine’s Law Dictionary with Pronunciations
Third Edition
 by James A. Ballantine (James Arthur 1871-1949).  Edited by William S. Anderson.  © 1969 by THE LAWYER’S CO-OPERATIVE PUBLISHING COMPANY.  Library of Congress Catalog Card No. 68-30931

[3]:  Ballantine’s Law Dictionary Legal Assistant Edition
by Jack Ballantine 
(James Arthur 1871-1949).  Doctored by Jack G. Handler, J.D. © 1994 Delmar by Thomson Learning.  ISBN 0-8273-4874-6.

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