Code – the published statutes of a jurisdiction, arranged in a systematic form by chapters and sections

     This page is continued from Criminal Law Self-Help >>>> Classification of Various Laws, Crimes, and Punishments >>>> Types of Laws:

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code:
(18c)

1. A complete system of positive law, carefully arranged and officially promulgated; a systematic collection or revision of laws, rules, or regulations. <the Uniform Commercial Code>.  *  Strictly, a code is a compilation not just of existing statutes, but also of much of the unwritten law on a subject, which is newly enacted as a complete system of law. — aka consolidated law.  See CODIFICATION. [1]

1. The published statutes of a jurisdiction, arranged in a systematic form by chapters and sections; a part of the statutes of a jurisdiction, such as a Commercial Code, or Practice Code; the official or authenticated book or books of statutes; a systematic and complete body of law, Johnson v Harrison, 47 Minn 575, 578; a codification of the entire body of law, or of the entire body of law on a distinct subject, compiled by a selective process, including some modifications of, and additions to, pre-existing law, and made official through legislative adoption, Central of Georgia Railway Co. v State, 104 Ga 83!, 31 SE 531; Litchtield v Roper, 192 NC .202, 205, 134 SE 651; a set of signs or symbols used in sending messages for the purpose of secrecy. [2]

1. The published statutes of a jurisdiction, arranged in systematic form.  EXAMPLE: The United States Code.

2. A portion of the statutes of a jurisdiction, especially the statutes relating to a particular subject.  EXAMPLES: A a state’s criminal code or tax code. [3]

     Excerpt from William M. Lile et al.’s Brief Making and the Use of Law Books  (Roger W. Cooley & Charles Lesley Ames eds., 3d ed. 1914):

     “A code is not only a collection of the existing statutory law, but also of much of the unwritten law on any subject, and is composed partly of such materials as might be at hand from all sources — from statutes, cases, and from customs — supplemented by such amendments, alterations, and additions as are deemed by the codifiers necessary to harmonize and perfect the existing system. In fact, in making a code, new laws may be added and old laws repealed in order to constitute a complete system. [4]

References:

Disclaimer: All material throughout this website is compiled in accordance with Fair Use.

[1]: Black’s Law Dictionary Deluxe Tenth Edition by Henry Campbell Black & Editor in Chief Bryan A. Garner. ISBN: 978-0-314-62130-6

[2]: Ballantine’s Law Dictionary with Pronunciations
Third Edition
 by James A. Ballantine (James Arthur 1871-1949).  Edited by William S. Anderson.  © 1969 by THE LAWYER’S CO-OPERATIVE PUBLISHING COMPANY.  Library of Congress Catalog Card No. 68-30931

[3]:  Ballantine’s Law Dictionary Legal Assistant Edition
by Jack Ballantine 
(James Arthur 1871-1949).  Doctored by Jack G. Handler, J.D. © 1994 Delmar by Thomson Learning.  ISBN 0-8273-4874-6.

[4]: William M. Lile et al., Brief Making and the Use of Law Books 18-19 (Roger W. Cooley & Charles Lesley Ames eds., 3d ed. 1914).

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