Bureau of Indian Affairs – a unit in the U.S. Department of the Interior responsible for helping Indian and Alaskan native people manage their affairs under the trust relationship with the U.S. and for promoting programs for their benefit

Bureau of Indian Affairs:

1. A unit in the U.S. Department of the Interior responsible for helping Indian and Alaskan native people manage their affairs under the trust relationship with the U.S. and for promoting programs for their benefit.  *  Originally created as part of the War Department in 1824, the Bureau was transferred to the Interior Department in 1849. — Abbr. BIA. [1]

1. A federal agency in the Department of the Interior, headed by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs who is appointed by the President by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, the purpose of the agency being to facilitate and simplify the administration of the laws governing Indian Affairs.  25 USC §§ 1, 1a

Indian agent:

1. A United States government officer who lives on or near an Indian reservation as the representative of the government in its relations with the tribe and whose duty it is to serve the interests of the Indians of the tribe. [2]

Websites:

Bureau of Indian Affairs

Department of the Interior

See also Bureau of Indian Affairs’ official Directory Map of Tribal Offices.

References:

Disclaimer: All material throughout this website is pertinent to people everywhere, and is being utilized in accordance with Fair Use.

[1]: Black’s Law Dictionary Deluxe Tenth Edition by Henry Campbell Black & Editor in Chief Bryan A. Garner. ISBN: 978-0-314-62130-6

[2]: Ballantine’s Law Dictionary with Pronunciations
Third Edition
 by James A. Ballantine (James Arthur 1871-1949).  Edited by William S. Anderson.  © 1969 by THE LAWYER’S CO-OPERATIVE PUBLISHING COMPANY.  Library of Congress Catalog Card No. 68-30931

******************************************

Back to Indian Country Law

Civil Proceedings (Torts) – Pro Se Self-Help

Criminal Proceedings Pro Se Self-Help

Intro to U.S. Law

All Types of Court Orders

Supreme Court Rulings

Federal Rules of Procedure

Like this website?

Please Support Our Fundraiser

or donate via PayPal:

Notice: Wild Willpower does not condone the actions of Maximilian Robespierre, however the above quote is excellent!

This website is being broadcast for First Amendment purposes courtesy of

Questions?  Suggestion(s) for improvement?  Want to offer financial support?  Email Distance@WildWillpower.org.  We look forward to hearing from you!