Writs to Recover Property (estates) of Ancestors/Relatives:

Writ of Aiel:

“2. A writ by an heir of a grandfather for recovery of the grandfather’s estate, which had been wrongfully possessed by a stranger. — Also spelled aile; ayel; ayle. – Also termed aiel.[1]

Writ of Besayel:

n. [Law French] Hist. 1. A writ of right used by a great-grandfather’s heirs to recover property held by the great-grandfather.”

Writ of Cosinage:

(15c.) Hist. A writ used by an heir to secure the right to land held by a great-great-grandfather or certain collateral relatives. – Also spelled cosenage;
cousinage: Also termed consanguineo; de consanguineo.

     Excerpt from Frederick Pollock & Frederic W. Maitland’s The History of English Law Before the Time of Edward I:

    “[T]here is the closest possible affinity between the Mort d’Ancestor & the action of Cosinage. If l claim the seisin of my uncle, l use the one; if l claim the seisin of a first cousin, I use the other. But procedurally, the two stand far apart.

References:

[1]: All definitions from: Black’s Law Dictionary Deluxe Tenth Edition by Henry Campbell Black & Editor in Chief Bryan A. Garner. ISBN: 978-0-314-62130-6

[2]: 2 Excerpt from Frederick Pollock & Frederic W. Maitland’ The History of English Law Before the Time of Edward I  569 lld ed. 99)

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