Grand Larceny – larceny of property worth more than a specified value (usually $100); the minimum differs from state to state

     This page is continued from Criminal Law >> Types of Crimes and Corresponding Laws >> Theft >> Various Forms (and Degrees) of Theft (and corresponding laws) >> Larceny:

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grand larceny:
(1828)

1. Larceny of property worth more than a statutory cutoff amount, usually $100. [1]

1. At common law, larceny wherein the value of the property stolen exceeded twelve pence.  Under modern statutes, the offense of the larcenous taking of property above a specified value, also such a taking of property of a specified kind, from a specified place, or from the person of another, irrespective of the value of the property taken.  32 Am J1st Larc § 3. [2]

1. Larceny of property above a specified value.  The minimum differs from state to state. [3]

     Excerpt from Rollin M. Perkins & Ronald N. Boyce’s Criminal Law (3d ed. 1982):

     “The English law, as the result of an early statute [the Statute of Westminster I, ch. 15 (1275)], classified this offense [larceny] as either

(1) grand larceny or
(2) petit larceny (now frequently written petty larceny),

the former being a capital offense and the latter punishable by forfeiture of goods and whipping, but not death.  Both, as mentioned earlier, were felonies.  The offense was grand larceny if the value of the property stolen exceeded twelve pence and petit larceny if it did not.  Modern statutes very generally retain this same classification (sometimes without using these labels) but with different penalties and different values set as the dividing line. [4]

References:

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[1]: Black’s Law Dictionary Deluxe Tenth Edition by Henry Campbell Black, Editor in Chief Bryan A. Garner. ISBN: 978-0-314-61300-4

[2]: Ballantine’s Law Dictionary with Pronunciations
Third Edition
 by James A. Ballantine (James Arthur 1871-1949).  Edited by William S. Anderson.  © 1969 by THE LAWYER’S CO-OPERATIVE PUBLISHING COMPANY.  Library of Congress Catalog Card No. 68-30931

[3]: Ballantine’s Law Dictionary Legal Assistant Edition by Jack Ballantine (James Arthur 1871-1949).  Doctored by Jack G. Handler, J.D. © 1994 Delmar by Thomson Learning.  ISBN 0-8273-4874-6.

[4]: Rollin M. Perkins & Ronald N. Boyce, Criminal Law 335 (3d ed. 1982).

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