robbery – the felony of stealing from a person (body) or in the person’s presence, with violence or intimidation (aggravated larceny)

     This page is continued from Criminal Law Self-Help >>>> Various Crimes and Corresponding Laws >>>> Theft:

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robbery:
n. (12c)

1. The illegal taking of property from the person of another, or in the person’s presence, by violence or intimidation; aggravated larceny.  *  Robber is usually a felony, but some jurisdictions classify some robberies as high misdemeanors. — aka (in Latin) crimen roberiae. — rob, vb. [1]

1. The felonious taking of money or goods of value from the person of another or in his presence, against his will, by force or by putting him in fear. 46 Am J1st Rob § 2.

The gist of the offense of robbery both at common law and under the Illinois statute is the force or intimidation employed in taking from the person of another, and against his will, property belonging to him or in his care, custody, or control. People v Casey, 399 I11 374, 77 NE2d 812, 11 ALR2d 865.

An intent to deprive an owner of his property and to convert it to the use and benefit of the accused is an essential element of the offense of robbery. People v Gallegos, 130 Colo 232, 274 P2d 608, 46 ALR2d 1224. [2]

1. The felonious taking of money or any thing of value from the person of another or from his presence, against his will, by force or by putting him in fear. [3]

     Excerpt from Richard Burn, The Justice of the Peace and Parish Officer 612-13 (3d ed. 1756)

     “There are two kinds of robbery; from the person, and from the house . . .; the latter, viz. robbery from the house, belongeth to the titles Larceny and Burglary. . . . Robbery is a felony by the common law, committed by a violent assault upon the person of another, but putting him in fear, and taking from his person, his money or other goods, of any value whatsoever. [4]

     Excerpt from Rollin M. Perkins & Ronald N. Boyce’s Criminal Law (3d ed. 1982):

     “Robbery is larceny from the person by violence or intimidation.  It is a felony both at common law and under modern statutes.  Under some of the new penal codes robbery does not require an actual taking of property.  If force or intimidation is used in the attempt to commit theft this is sufficient. [5]

Related Terms:

aggravated robbery (1878) Robbery committed by a person who either carries a dangerous weapon -0 en called armed robbery -or inflicts bodily harm on someone during the robbery.  *  Some statutes also specify that a robbery is aggravated when the victim is a member of a protected class, such as children or the elderly.

armed robbery (1926) Robbery committed by a person carrying a dangerous weapon. regardless of whether the weapon is revealed or used. 0 *  Most states punish armed robbery as an aggravated form of robbery rather than as a separate crime.

conjoint robbery (1902) A robbery committed by two or more persons.

highway robbery (18c) 1. Robbery committed against a traveler on or near a public highway. 2. Figuratively, a price or fee that is unreasonably high; excessive profit or advantage.

simple robbery (18c) Robbery that does not involve an aggravating factor or circumstance. [1]

robber – A person who commits the crime of robbery. In loose usage, one who steals from or defrauds another.

robbery insurance – Insurance covering a loss by robbery, that is by a crime containing all the elements of the offense of robbery. Anno: 48 ALR2d 19.

A coverage of the felonious and forcible taking of the property of the insured by violence inflicted upon the custodian of the property, by putting such per. son in fear of violence, or by any overt felonious act committed in the presence of such person and of which he was actually cognizant at the time. 29A Am 1 Rev ed Ins § 1338. [2]

References:

Disclaimer: All material throughout this website is pertinent to people everywhere, and is being utilized in accordance with Fair Use.

[1]: Black’s Law Dictionary Deluxe Tenth Edition by Henry Campbell Black, Editor in Chief Bryan A. Garner. ISBN: 978-0-314-61300-4

[2]: Ballantine’s Law Dictionary with Pronunciations
Third Edition
 by James A. Ballantine (James Arthur 1871-1949).  Edited by William S. Anderson.  © 1969 by THE LAWYER’S CO-OPERATIVE PUBLISHING COMPANY.  Library of Congress Catalog Card No. 68-30931

[3]: Ballantine’s Law Dictionary Legal Assistant Edition by Jack Ballantine (James Arthur 1871-1949).  Doctored by Jack G. Handler, J.D. © 1994 Delmar by Thomson Learning.  ISBN 0-8273-4874-6.

[4]: Richard Burn, The Justice of the Peace and Parish Officer 612-13 (3d ed. 1756).

[5]: Rollin M. Perkins & Ronald N. Boyce, Criminal Law 343 (3d ed. 1982).

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