All posts by adraghastar@gmail.com

Founder, Architect, and Campaign Organizer at Wild Willpower.

Getting Started

     Chances are, if you found this website, you were wronged in some way.  Perhaps your rights were violated by a police officer — or your property was stolen Maybe you’re a member of an American Indian tribe and your tribe’s treaty was violated.  Is a corporation attempting to destroy your local ecosystem, and no one is holding them accountable?  You likely came to this website because you weren’t able to find strong legal representation, and you need a vast array of credible legal information asap before the statute of limitations runs out.

     We think you are going to be pleasantly surprised and impressed by the website we’ve put together here.  We — like you — were hurt badly by someone, and became frustrated when we couldn’t find help.  So we took it upon ourselves to attempt to map the system.  Now, after years of compiling and organizing legal term definitions, we are proud to present to you the Public Intelligence Agency.

     This site contains step-by step walkthroughs for the civil law and criminal law systems by using legal term definitions from federally-recommended law dictionaries which have been neatly organized into navigable categories.  The site also contains

    Before we get to the step by step walkthroughs, the following links should help to get you oriented.  Clicking on any of the links throughout this site won’t close the page you’re on.

Notice: Sections throughout this website are being upgraded daily.  You will likely witness incomplete sections throughout your search.  As of 2/24/2018, we predict that most of the site will be in order by mid-March 2018.

i. How to Navigate This Site

ii. Civil Law and Criminal Law – what’s the difference?

iii. Time Limits for Filing Various Types of Cases

iv. Pro Se Self-Help, and Assisting Others as a Non-Lawyer

     The step-by-step walkthroughs, for both the civil section and the criminal section, are divided into two parts:

Civil Law Self-Help

Criminal Law Self-Help

Additional Sections Throughout The Site:

      Many pages found throughout the following links are referenced (and linked) throughout the above walkthroughs.  However, if you’d like to explore these sections on their own in order to perceive a more “bird’s eye view” on the legal system in its entirety, exploring the following sections on their own should help with just that.  Again, we are upgrading the website daily, so expect that some sections are more finished than others.

i.  Legal Precepts Adopted into U.S. Law (from Europe) through the Constitution

ii.  § § of Law which came pursuant to the American Revolution

iii.  Indian Country Law – history, legal term definitions, maps, political associations, and Supreme Court Rulings, Acts of Congress, and Executive Orders which have historically affected and/or are still in effect.

iv.  All Federal Courts – histories, purposes, and functions of each.

v.  Various Types of “Persons” – litigation terms, including natural persons, all types of artificial persons, and various terms for types of litigants.

vi. Property – the “bundle of rights” (to possess, use, exclude, or transfer) associated with a valued resource such as land, chattel, or an intangible.

vii. Ownership – the “bundle of rights” to possess, use, manage, enjoy, and/or convey property to others.

viii. Tenancy – the possession or occupancy of real property or personal property by right or title.

ix.  Various forms of Jurisdiction – a government’s power to exercise authority over all persons and things within its territory, and a court’s power to decide a case or issue a decree.

x.  Fiduciary Relationships – includes agencies, trusts, guardian/ward relationship, client-attorney relationships, and more.

Various Types of Legal Instruments:

contract – a written agreement between two or more parties creating obligations enforceable &/or recognized at law.

charging instrument – any of three formal legal documents used to officially charge someone with a crime.

deed – a written instrument that is signed, sealed, and delivered and that conveys some interest in property.

guaranty – a written promise to answer for the debt, default, or miscarriage of another person, provided such person does not respond by payment or performance.

power of attorney – an instrument granting someone authority to act as agent or attorney-in-fact for the grantor, thus creating an agency relationship. — aka letter of attorney; warrant of attorney.

security – any interest or instrument relating to finances.

  • bond – a written promise acknowledging the obligation to pay a debt; either as money or to perform some act if certain circumstances occur or a certain time elapses.
  • lien – a legal right or proprietary interest a creditor retains in property until the debt &/or duty that it secures is satisfied.
  • mortgage – a conveyance of title to property that is given as security for the payment of a debt or the performance of a duty and that will become void upon payment or performance according to the stipulated terms. — aka (archaically) dead pledge.

undertaking – a written promise, pledge, or engagement thereby binding the signatory to the obligation; unlike a bond, the principal is not required to sign an undertaking.

negotiable instrument – a written instrument that is signed by the maker or drawer, includes an unconditional promise or order to pay a specified sum of money, is payable on demand or at a definite time, and is payable to order or to bearer.

  • negotiable – capable of being transferred by delivery or indorsement when the transferee takes the instrument for value, in good faith, and without notice of conflicting title claims or defenses.

     Additional sections will be added, however we’ll continue to make the website as concise and simple-to-navigate as possible.

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     “Lost is our simplicity of times, The world abounds with laws, and teems with crimes.

– Anonymous [1]

References:

[1] Thesaurus of Quotations by Edmund Fuller.  Copyright1941 by Crown Publishers.

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Civil Law Self-Help

     This page is continued from Getting Started >>>> How to Navigate this Site >>>> Civil Law and Criminal Law – what’s the difference?:

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Contents of Page:

i. Criminal and Civil Law – what’s the difference?
ii. Introduction to Civil Law
iii. Overcome Your Prejudices and Face the System

iv. Get to Know the Federal Courts
v. Step-by-Step Instruction for Filing a Civil Action

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i. Civil Law and Criminal Law
are very different from one another:

     Most people tend to be more familiar with the criminal law system, than they are the civil law system: if you’ve ever been given a ticket or arrested — youve encountered a criminal proceeding.  If you’re unsure the difference, please read the article

Civil Law and Criminal Law;
what’s the difference?

ii. Introduction to Civil Law:

     Civil law is much different: think of it as “civilian law” in that it generally deals with violations against the rights of civilians; if that brings you a spark of hope, it should!  Some incidents may be tried in a criminal proceeding (where the government is the prosecutor) and in a civil proceeding (where the citizen(s) is the plaintiff).

     Civil law originated in Rome, from the Roman civil republicPrior to that time, there were mainly empires and city-states which had conquered various tribes and ruled subjects in a top-down manner much similar to way that corporations maintain order over their employees.  The civil republic was conceived in order to counteract the power structure of the many empires that were in place at the time and that still are — to give civilians the “keys to the kingdom” to hold government officials accountable, and to steer the country with logic, reason, and good will instead of propaganda, condemnation, and anger.  The only catch is that in order for a civilian to enforce their will “into” the system in such a way that the officers become authorized to respond, they must first file what is known as a “civil action” and/or a criminal complaint (depending on the circumstances): this makes it so that government officials do make top-down executive decisions that violate the rights of civilians, citizens can hold officers accountable and seek redress through the courts; when the public is knowledgeable, official misconduct goes down, officer/civilian relations remain positive, and the public remains engaged with navigating workable solutions to help move the country forward.  When the public is not informed or engaged with the process that is in place, there is often confusion and contempt toward government officials who continue to operate “like clockwork” to uphold the system: they are the “guardians” of a safe path forward for society while preventing economic collapse, mobs, arson, and other activities which compromise the safety  and security of millions of people around the world; building a case means assessing and considering many factors before filing, so that a wise, workable form(s) of relief are requested rather than unreasonable, unworkable demands that benefit only some while hurting others.  Continue studying and the rest will come to you!

What Types of Cases can be Brought in a Civil Action,
And What Can the Court do to Help?

     Although historically there were 11 common-law forms of action; today these have all been simplified into the one form of action known as the civil action.  To better understand the scope of the types of circumstances a civil action is equipped to handle, it is helpful to look through these historical

11 Common-Law
Forms of Action.

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iii. Overcome Your Prejudices:

The Complexity of Law;
Overcome Your Fears and Prejudices, and
Equip Yourself with Knowledge:

     There are a myriad of legal terms to equip yourself with, however as you continue reading, things will begin to make logical sense; the more you learn, the more you will likely come to the conclusion that it is not the system itself that is corrupt, but rather it is the general lack of knowledge about how the legal system is designed which has been creating a disconnect between the government and its citizens, and between citizens and each other.  As citizens equip themselves with more legal knowledge, many of the problems society is facing may be addressed in an orderly, efficient, logical, effective, and wise manner in a way that can actually help people.

iv. Get to Know the Federal Courts:

     Although many cases are resolved in local and state courts, federal courts also play an essential role; for instance, what if local government officials violated your rights?  What about treaties with American Indians?  There are many cases where federal courts come into play, and it is important to know about them, how and when to transfer venue from a state court to a federal court when your case is of federal question, and other elements regarding their history, purpose, and functions:

Federal Courts;
Histories, Purpose, and Functions

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v. Step-by-Step Instructions
for Filing a Civil Action:

      Below we’ve compiled a step-by-step process to help you assess your own circumstances and prepare yourself to file with the courts whether you’re filing against a private individual, corporate employee, government official, or whoever.  Within each step you’ll find two legal terms followed by a short definition as to what each of them means.  By clicking on any of the green legal terms, you’ll find definitions from federally-recommended law dictionaries, as well as addition information which will open up inside a separate window; you will also find several types of each of the following terms (i.e. torts, injuries, damages, etc.) within each of the links.  For each of the following terms, click on the title, then scroll down the page, then write down (or copy into a file) each term which applies to the case(s) you have in mind.  By learning “the language of the courts” you will be able to articulate and clearly convey to the courts precisely what transpired andaccording to the law, what you are due and/or what can logically be done to remedy the situation.  The rest is explained below or within the following links.

1. Which type(s) of Action(s)
caused the Injuries and/or Losses?

      Depending on your circumstances, click on one of the following terms: the rest is explained inside each link.

tort – a wrongful act, other than a breach of contract, which causes a private injury which may be pursued by the injured party.

breach of contract – violation of a contractual obligation by failing to perform one’s own promise, by repudiating it, or by interfering with another party’s performance.

2. Which type(s) of Injuries
and/or Loss(es) were Suffered?

injury – includes physical wounding of one’s person (a physical injury to the body) or a non-physical injury (i.e. the violation of a legal right).

loss – the decrease or total diminishing in value of property, usually in an unexpected or relatively unpredictable way, or the act of losing something that is gone and cannot be recovered, such as a life or friendship, etc.

3. Which Type(s) of Redress will You Be Seeking from the Courts?

     Now that you know whether you’re facing a tort or breach of contract case, and you know which type of tort or breach of contract occurred, as well as which type of injuries and/or losses were suffered, it is time to think about whether you’re seeking damages (money) and/or an injunction in order to help remedy the situation.  Click the following in order to assess the damages and read through the various types of injunctions which may be requested from the courts:

damages – how much money do you need in order to recover from the losses and/or injuries you sustained?

injunction – a court order commanding an action to be done, or preventing an action from being done an “Equitable Remedy” that the plaintiff has shown to be necessary for preventing (further) injury.

4. Determine which type of Action(s) and which type of Claim(s) you’ll be Filing:

civil action – an action brought to enforce, redress, or protect a private or civil right; a noncriminal litigation.

claim – a legal demand, by a person wanting compensation, payment, or reimbursement, for a loss or injury caused by a breach of contract or a tort.

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If Necessary, Provide Notice:

     One last step before filing a claim is to make sure you’ve provided notice if necessary; providing “due notice” is an essential component in assuring that those you are filing against are provided with due process (see adjective law to learn more).  Providing notice to all parties involved ensures that they:

(1) have actual knowledge of it;
(2) have received information about it;
(3) have reason to know about it;
(4) know about a related fact; or
(5) are considered as having been able to ascertain it by checking an official filing or recording.

Filing A Claim:

     Once you’ve gone through each of the above links and followed the steps within them, you’re ready to learn the:

Federal Rules of Civil Procedure
(Self-Help Walk-Through)

     and:

Federal Rules of Evidence.

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Disclaimer: Wild Willpower does not condone the actions of Maximilian Robespierre, however the above quote is excellent!

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Page coming soon.

Criminal Law Self-Help

     This page is continued from Getting Started >>>> How to Navigate this Site >>>> Civil Law and Criminal Law – what’s the difference?:

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What is a Crime?

     A crime is a wrongful act that the state or federal government has identified as a crime because it injures or interferes with the interest of society.  Crimes are identified within a publicly-accessible, fixed body of statutes (penal codes, ordinances, building codes, etc.) called laws, which are enforced by officers. 

   A criminal case is a criminal proceeding.  The accused is called a ‘defendant”.  The victim is:

  • the person who has been hurt.
  • the state.
  • other governmental agency (i.e. city, county, etc.).

     The charges are brought by the government.  If the defendant loses, the defendant must serve a sentence.  A fine is paid to the government and there is possible restitution to the victim. [1]

When Criminal Activity causes a Tort,
the Case can be Tried as Civil and Criminal:

     Laws which are likely to violate civil rights are a liability against taxpayers; such laws can be challenged and overturned via following the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (see Rule 5.1).

     When an officer violates a civilian’s rights, it is called a Constitutional tort (a type of tort). 

     If the officer violated procedure and commit a crime, it is called a color of law crime.  If the (county, city, state, federal, tribal, etc.) agency did not properly train or vet the officer, the agency can be held accountable via filing a claim.

Fair Administration of Justice:

     The judicial branch must apply the existing laws to each individual situation, to be sure justice is administered fairly.  This includes punishing those who are guilty of breaking the law, and keeping the rest of the community safe from crime.  

     At the U.S. District Court level, the government is represented by the United States Attorney (or an Assistant United States Attorney), also called the prosecuting attorney.

The 6th Amendment Guarantees
Right to Counsel:

     In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense.

      Anyone accused of a federal felony has a right to be assisted by a lawyer for every step of the process, even if they can’t afford one.  (A felony is a crime carrying a jail term of more than one year.)   The defendant can retain, or hire, their own defense attorney, or they may have one appointed for them if they financially unable to hire an attorney for their defense.  In many cases, the appointed attorney will be from the Federal Public Defenders Office.  Defendants are also allowed to represent themselves, and this is called pro se[2]

Various Types of Laws:

code – the published statutes of a jurisdiction, arranged in a systematic form by chapters and sections. — aka consolidated law.

  • penal code – the published criminal statutes of a jurisdiction, usually defining and categorizing offenses, and setting forth their respective punishments. — aka criminal code.
  • Model Penal Code – a proposed criminal code prepared jointly by the Commission on Uniform State Laws and the American Law Institute, used as the basis for criminal-law revision by many states. — Abbr. MPC.
  • Uniform Commercial Code – governs commercial transactions (i.e. sales, leases, negotiable instruments, deposits and collections, letters of credit, bulk sales, warehouse receipts, bills of lading and other documents of title, investment securities, and secured transactions). — Abbr. UCC.
  • United States Code – the official codification of general and permanent laws enacted by congress. — Abbr. USC.

court rules – regulations having the force of law and governing practice and procedure in the various courts.

ordinance – an authoritative law or decree; specifically, a municipal regulation, especially one that forbids or restricts an activity.

policy – A standard course of action that has been officially established by an organization, business, political party.

  • public policy – the policy (course of action) in relation to the administration of the law, to protect and promote the general welfare of the public.

statute – a legislation (aka act or law) enacted by any lawmaking body, such as a legislature, administrative board, or municipal court.

Varying Degrees of Crimes:

felony – a serious crime usually punishable by imprisonment for more than one year or by death. (i.e. burglary, arson, rape, murder, treason, robbery, larceny). — aka major crime; serious crime.

misdemeanor – a crime less serious than a felony, usually punishable by fine, penalty, forfeiture, or confinement (usually a brief term) in jail (rather than prison). — aka minor crime; summary offense.

infraction – a violation, usually of a rule, regulation, or local ordinance, not punishable by incarceration.

offense – synonymous with “crime.” — aka criminal offense.

Legal Terms used to help Classify Crimes:

aggravated – made worse or more serious by circumstances such as violence, the presence of a deadly weapon, or the intent to commit another crime.

  • simple – (of a crime) not accompanied by aggravating circumstances.

conspiracy – an agreement by two or more persons to commit an unlawful act, coupled with an intent to achieve the agreement’s objective, including any action or conduct that furthers the agreement.

corruptsubverting the instrumentalities of government to personal profit; impeding or obstructing the administration of justice.

malice – intent to commit a wrongful act; reckless disregard of the law or of a person’s legal rights. malicious, vb.

unjust enrichment – unlawful, unjustifiable retention of property, without consent from the transferor(s), for which the beneficiary must make restitution or recompense.

Various Crimes
and Corresponding §§ of the U.S. Code:

     Select any of the following broad categories for specific crimes and corresponding laws:

color of law crimes – when government employees abuse their authority or deprive a person’s rights under “color” or *appearance* of law.

election fraud and electioneering – includes sections on gerrymandering and lobbying.

environmental crimes – statutory offenses involving harm to air, water, or soil quality, or the harming of endangered species.

homicide – the killing of a human being by another, under any circumstances.

 

 

obstruction of justice – impeding or hindering the administration of justice in any way (i.e. fabricating or destroying evidence, witness-tampering, or threatening or intimidating a judge, bribing a juror). — aka obstructing justice; obstructing public justice; perverting the course of justice; interfering with the administration of justice; obstructing the administration of justice; obstructing the course of justice; defeating the due course of justice; defeating the ends of justice; attempting to pervert the course of justice.

fraud a knowing misrepresentation or concealment of a material fact made to induce another to part with anything of value or surrender some legal right.  i.e. – election fraud.

theft – taking something to which one is not entitled, by whatever means (i.e. robbery, burglary, embezzlement, extortion, fraud).

unlawful detainer – the unjustifiable retention of the possession of real property by one whose original entry was lawful.

racketeering – a pattern of illegal activity (i.e. bribery, extortion, fraud, murder) carried out as part of an enterprise (i.e. crime syndicate) that is owned or controlled by the conspirators.

treason – attempting to overthrow one’s state or the United States, either by making or inciting war against the government or by materially supporting its enemies.

trespass – a misfeasance, transgression, or offense which damages another’s person, health, reputation, or property.

  • burglary – breaking and entering any building with the intent to commit a felony (i.e. larceny, murder).

subversion – the process of overthrowing, destroying, or corrupting the government, often by infiltrating the government to undermine domestic policy.

Types of Punishments:

fine – a monetary penalty imposed as punishment upon a person convicted of a crime.

forfeiture – a divestiture of property without compensation, in consequence of a default or an offense.

restitution – in cases of unjust enrichment (i.e. fraud, theft), compensation paid by a criminal to a victim, ordered as part of a sentence or as a condition of probation.

Types of Pleadings in Criminal Cases:

criminal complaint – a formal charge accusing a person of having commit a criminal offense.

indictment – the formal written accusation of a felony, made by a grand jury and presented to a court for prosecution against the accused person.

information – a formal criminal charge made by a prosecutor without a grand-jury indictment; technically, an accusation of the commission of a crime, otherwise known as a complaint or affidavit.

References:

Disclaimer: All material throughout this website is compiled in accordance with Fair Use.

Featured Image of Lady Justice from article, “Speaking of Allegory,” by David Scott: https://dtldobsvtn.wordpress.com/2011/05/26/speaking-of-allegory/

[1]: LawHelp.org, GeorgeLegalAid.org, “The Difference between Torts and Crimes” by: Carl Vinson Institute of Government, University of Georgia:  www.georgialegalaid.org/resource/the-difference-between-torts-and-crimes

[2]: Judicial Learning Center, “What Courts Do; Criminal Cases”:  http://judiciallearningcenter.org/types-of-court-cases/

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Disclaimer: Wild Willpower does not condone the actions of Maximilian Robespierre, however the above quote is excellent!

This website is being broadcast for First Amendment purposes courtesy of

Question(s)?  Suggestion(s)?
Distance@WildWillpower.org.
We look forward to hearing from you!

Constitutional Law & Civil Rights Self-Help:

     Many who have not studied law assume “the system” to be irreparably corrupt.  However, the legal system operates much like a machine, containing legal mechanics.  Jurisprudence (“the study of the application of law”) is an age-old science, designed to protect people from being wronged by predators acting from within a government agency or as members of the public (including corporations), while also providing the opportunity to access redress, overturn unjust laws, create needed policy reforms to prevent rights from being violated  in the future, and, in short, aid yourself, humanity, and the planet.

Rising from The Ashes;
A Movement to Create a Just Society
and a Functional Governing System:

     Though the legal system is stained by historical injustices and these forces still haunt the system today from within and from without, the reason we built this site is to help people read what the laws actually say, and how to operate them for the purpose of actualizing justice.  Reports of government corruption are widespread.  Protests are rampant.  This website is a tool to help:

     The only “catch” is that someone(s) actually has to take the time to  gather and stack the evidence, then follow through with due process.

Special Thanks
for Helping to Make This Website Possible!

     Wild Willpower PAC would like to formally thank the many contributors who have collectively helped to make this website available to humanity.  Many of these “preservers of knowledge” are acknowledged within the the following section:

Federally-Recommended
Law Dictionaries
Utilized to Help Build This Website
.

     Additional contributors are referenced throughout this site; Wild Willpower PAC is working to make this knowledge as simple-to-navigate as possible, however it should be noted that this site should be read in context with our parent organization’s website, www.WildWillpower.org.

One Last Thing Before We Get Started:

     After reading through this site and seeing what we’ve been compiling, if you think this information is as important to have publicly available as we do, we ask you to do two things:

1.) Sign our petition if you think jurisprudence should be taught in all U.S. schools.
2.) Donate to and share our fundraiser to help our team acquire the resources we need so that our organization can properly function.

    Thank you so much for reading our platform and doing those two things!  Now let’s get started!

How to Navigate this Website:

     This website contains two self-help walkthroughs which each include links to simplified versions of the Federal Rules of Procedure.  To get started — in case you are unsure — please learn the difference between civil law and criminal law within the following article:

Civil Law and Criminal Law;
what’s the difference?

     If you already know the difference, feel free to use these self-help sections to help you with your circumstances:

Civil Law (Torts) Self-Help Walkthrough

Criminal Law Self-Help Walkthrough

What Else Is On The Website?

    Due to the inescapable fact that law contains meganumerous legal terms spanning an array of definable, sortable concepts and utilities, we’ve categorized many of them (work in constant progress) into the following four menus; terms are linked all throughout the website, and clicking on a link won’t close the page you’re on.  Sections of this website are updated daily, so if you find an unfinished link, check back in a week and see what’s new.  When you notice change and find the information you need, don’t forget to donate occasionally.  Now, explore and learn!

Intro

i.  Legal Precepts Adopted into U.S. Law (from Europe) through the Constitution

ii.  § § of Law which came pursuant to the American Revolution

iii.  Indian Country Law – history, legal term definitions, maps, political associations, and Supreme Court Rulings, Acts of Congress, and Executive Orders which have historically affected and/or are still in effect.

iv.  All Federal Courts – histories, purposes, and functions of each.

Essential Terms:

i.  Types of “Persons” – litigation terms, including natural persons, all types of artificial persons, and various terms for types of litigants.

ii. Property – the “bundle of rights” (to possess, use, exclude, or transfer) associated with a valued resource such as land, chattel, or an intangible.

iii. Ownership – the “bundle of rights” to possess, use, manage, enjoy, &/or convey property to others:

iv. Tenancy – the possession or occupancy of real property or personal property by right or title.

v.  Various forms of Jurisdiction – a government’s power to exercise authority over all persons and things within its territory, and a court’s power to decide a case or issue a decree.

Instrumentalities:

i.  All About Jury Trials

ii.  Court Orders – categorized, like we do.

iii. Legal Instruments – formal documents evidencing the granting of a right and/or agreement (including duties, entitlements, or liabilities).

iv. fiduciary relationships – one person is under a duty to act with a high degree of care for the benefit of another(s) on matters within the scope of the relationship.

v.  Pleadings – formal documents setting forth or responding to allegations, claims, denials, or defenses.

vi. Agreement – a written or unwritten mutual understanding.

vii.  Motions – request a the judge to issue a specific ruling or order.

viii.  Objections – oppose something that has occurred or is about to occur: seek the judge’s immediate ruling on the point.

Getting Started:

i. Civil Law and Criminal Law – what’s the difference?

ii. Pro Se Self-Help, and Assisting Others as a Non-Lawyer – things to know.

iii. File against an Officer or Government Agency – hold officers accountable via the criminal law system, and claim redress via the civil law system, for “Color of Law Crimes.”

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     All the above menu items and the definitions found throughout them are linked within the:

Federal Rules of Procedure Simplified

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Want to help it continue to grow?

Please Support Our Fundraiser

or donate via PayPal:

 

Disclaimer: Wild Willpower does not condone the actions of Maximilian Robespierre, however the above quote is excellent!

This website is being broadcast for First Amendment purposes courtesy of

Question(s)?  Suggestion(s)?
Distance@WildWillpower.org.
We look forward to hearing from you!

Updated 11-17-2017, 11-20-2017, 11-26-2017, 12-10-2017.

About This Website

– PRESENTS –

The Public Intelligence Agency

www.WildWillpower.org

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DISCLAIMER:

This website does not contain legal advice; all information throughout this website is compiled in accordance with the Preamble, the First Amendment, and the U.S. Copyright Office’s Fair Use policy.

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Notice:

All contributions, including those raised through purchasing our campaign materials or from monthly sponsorships, are used in such a manner so as to directly and/or indirectly affect federal elections.  Wild Willpower PAC is registered as a nonconnected  “Civil PAC”.

About Wild Willpower PAC

Our National Plan

This website uses large print in consideration of visually impaired folk.

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